Genetically modified food cons and pros

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Indications Hypertension Preterm Labor V. Contraindications Congestive Heart Failure Aortic Stenosis Avoid stasis Diabetes Mellitus (may increase Proteinuria) Concomitant use of Magnesium SulfateTheoretically deactivates Calcium Gluconate antidote VI.

Dosing: Hypertension Nifedipine (Procardia) XL 30-60 mg PO qd (Maximum 120 qd) VII. Dosing: Preterm Labor Load: Nifedipine 10 mg sublingual every 20 minutes for 3 doses Maintenance: Sibutramine Hydrochloride Monohydrate (Meridia)- FDA to 20 mg PO every 4 to 8 hours VIII.

Adverse Effects Glycopyrrolate Injection (GLYRX-PF)- FDA Calcium Channel Blockers Avoid short acting agents (increased coronary risk) Fetal effectsRisk of Intrauterine Growth Retardation IX.

Monitoring: When ovul in Preterm Labor Blood Pressure Edema Serial Fetal Ultrasounds Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Nifedipine.

This information is provided only to help medical providers and their patients see relative costs. Insurance plans negotiate lower medication prices with suppliers. Prices shown here are out of pocket, non-negotiated rates. See Needy Meds for financial assistance information. Ontology: Nifedipine (C0028066) Definition (CHV) a drug used for hypertension Definition (NCI) A dihydropyridine calcium channel blocking agent.

Nifedipine inhibits the transmembrane influx of extracellular calcium genetically modified food cons and pros into myocardial and vascular smooth muscle cells, causing dilatation of the main coronary and systemic arteries and decreasing myocardial contractility.

This agent also inhibits the drug efflux pump P-glycoprotein which is overexpressed in some multi-drug resistant tumors and may improve the efficacy of some antineoplastic agents. It is a useful anti-anginal agent that also lowers blood pressure. Definition (CSP) calcium channel blocker used as a coronary vasodilator in the treatment of coronary insufficiency and angina.

Precautions Pharmacology Indications Contraindications Dosing: Hypertension Dosing: Preterm Labor Adverse Effects Monitoring: When used in Preterm Labor Extra: Related Bing Images Extra: Related Studies Extra: Medication Genetically modified food cons and pros Extra: UMLS Ontology Extra: Navigation Genetically modified food cons and pros About 2021 Family Practice Notebook, LLC. Gov Survey of genetically modified food cons and pros drug pricing) A dihydropyridine calcium channel blocking agent.

It is a significant contributor to cardiovascular events, cardiac death and kidney disease. A number of medication classes exist to aid healthcare providers and their patients in controlling hypertension. Nifedipine, a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, was once one of the most widely used medications for hypertension, but safety and tolerability concerns along with the introduction of new classes of antihypertensive medications and an increasing pool of data showing mortality benefit of other classes caused nifedipine to fall out of favor.

More recently, long-acting formulations were developed and made available to clinicians. These newer formulations were designed to address many of the concerns raised by earlier formulations of nifedipine.

Numerous clinical trials have been conducted comparing long-acting nifedipine to many of the more commonly prescribed antihypertensive medications. This review will address the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and the available clinical trial data on long-acting nifedipine and summarize its role in the management of hypertension. Keywords: nifedipine, calcium channel blockers, hypertension This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Genetically modified food cons and pros Limited.

Editorial PoliciesAuthor InformationPeer Review International clinical pharmacology journal OutlookCOVID-19 Usage 13752 k 23 Days 17 Days 67514 Submit New Manuscript Login to view existing manuscript genetically modified food cons and pros Signup for Journal alerts About Dove Press Open access peer-reviewed scientific and medical journals. Adults: Starting dose is 10 mg P.

Usual effective dosage range is 10 to 20 mg t. Some patients may need up to 30 mg q. Or, 30 to 60 mg (extended-release) P. Gradually increased at 7- to 14-day intervals or more frequently, if needed.

Maximum dose is 180 mg daily for capsules, 120 mg for extended-release tablets. Adults: Initially, 30 to 60 mg P. Adjust dosage at 7- to 14-day intervals based on patient tolerance and response. Maximum dose is 120 mg daily. Pharmacodynamics Antianginal action: Nifedipine dilates systemic arteries, resulting in decreased total peripheral resistance and modestly decreased systemic blood pressure with a slightly increased heart rate, decreased afterload, and increased cardiac index.

Reduced afterload and the subsequent decrease in myocardial oxygen consumption probably account for the value of nifedipine in treating chronic stable angina. Metabolism: Metabolized in the liver. Excretion: Excreted in urine and feces as inactive metabolites. Elimination half-life is 2 to 5 hours. Contraindications and precautions Contraindicated in patients hypersensitive to drug.

Use cautiously in elderly patients and patients with heart failure or hypotension. Use extended-release form admintool in patients with GI narrowing.

Beta blockers: May worsen angina, heart failure, and hypotension. Cimetidine: May decrease nifedipine metabolism. Digoxin: May increase serum genetically modified food cons and pros levels.

Monitor serum digoxin level. Fentanyl: May cause excessive hypotension. Hypotensive drugs: May precipitate excessive hypotension. Phenytoin: May increase phenytoin levels.

Melatonin: Interferes with antihypertensive effect of nifedipine. Grapefruit juice: Increases bioavailability of drug. Advise patient to avoid taking drug with grapefruit juice. Adverse reactionsCNS: dizziness, light-headedness, headache, weakness, syncope, nervousness, fever.

CV: peripheral edema, hypotension, palpitations, heart failure, MI, flushing.

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